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EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL AND REHABILITATION MEDICINE

A Journal on Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation after Pathological Events


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (SIMFER), European Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ESPRM), European Union of Medical Specialists - Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Section (UEMS-PRM), Mediterranean Forum of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (MFPRM), Hellenic Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (EEFIAP)
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European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2012 December;48(4):593-9

Copyright © 2012 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Relation between maximum phonation time and exercise capacity in chronic heart failure patients

Izawa K. P. 1, Watanabe S. 1, Tochimoto S. 1, Hiraki K. 1, Morio Y. 1, Kasahara Y. 1, Watanabe Y. 1, Tsukamoto T. 2, Osada N. 3, Omiya K. 3

1 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine Hospital, Kanagawa, Japan; 2 Department of Nursing, St. Marianna University, School of Medicine Hospital, Kanagawa, Japan; 3 Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kanagawa, Japan


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BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) commonly fatigue easily due to low peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2), an important index of exercise capacity. Maximum phonation time (MPT) is widely used to evaluate maximum vocal capabilities because it is non-invasive, quick, and inexpensive.
AIM: The aim of this study was to determine the relation between MPT and exercise capacity, and MPT required to attain an exercise capacity of ≥5 metabolic equivalents (METs) in CHF outpatients.
DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.
SETTING: Outpatient cardiac rehabilitation unit.
POPULATION: We enrolled 111 CHF outpatients (mean age 54.2±10.1 years).
METHODS: Peak VO2 was assessed during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) as the index of exercise capacity. After CPX, we divided the patients into two groups according to exercise capacity: ≥5 METs group (N.=68) and <5 METs group (N.=43). Measurements of MPT were taken in the seated position. All patients were asked to produce a sustained vowel /a:/ for as long as possible and were verbally encouraged during respiratory effort.
RESULTS: After adjustment for patient clinical characteristics, MPT in the CHF patients was found to be significantly higher in the ≥5 METs group than in the <5 METs group (22.1±8.4 vs. 17.0±11.6 s, F=13.5, P<0.001). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis of exercise capacity of ≥5 METs extracted a cutoff value for MPT of 18.27 s, with a sensitivity of 0.76, 1-specificity of 0.33, and AUC value of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.70-0.87, P<0.001).
CONCLUSION: There were differences in MPT in relation to an exercise capacity threshold of ≥5 METs in CHF outpatients. A MPT of 18.27 sec may be the best cutoff value to identify people with or without exercise capacity of ≥5 METs.
CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: Measurement of MPT may be a useful method for estimating exercise capacity in CHF outpatients.

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izawapk@ga2.so-net.ne.jp