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EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL AND REHABILITATION MEDICINE

A Journal on Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation after Pathological Events


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (SIMFER), European Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ESPRM), European Union of Medical Specialists - Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Section (UEMS-PRM), Mediterranean Forum of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (MFPRM), Hellenic Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (EEFIAP)
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European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2009 December;45(4):571-82

language: English

Understanding sagittal balance with a clinical perspective

Harding I.J.

Frenchay Hospital, Bristol, UK


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The sagittal plane of the spine has become an increasingly popular topic of discussion amongst healthcare professionals treating patients with spinal problems. The concepts surrounding the sagittal plane of the spine were initially investigated in detail in the French speaking world and French speakers continue to be at the forefront of investigations and debate that is now global. This review aims to clearly describe these concepts, define the terminology used and in particular make reference as to how this may impact on day to day clinical practice. In particular, the notion that our sagittal profile represents our own ‘spinal fingerprint’ - individual to each an every one of us – is discussed in detail and how potential changes in this can lead to commonly seen conditions. A greater understanding by healthcare professionals of the human sagittal plane will hopefully lead to better understanding of the spine in physiological and pathological states.

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ian.harding@nbt.nhs.uk