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CURRENT ISSUEEUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL AND REHABILITATION MEDICINE

A Journal on Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation after Pathological Events


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (SIMFER), European Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ESPRM), European Union of Medical Specialists - Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Section (UEMS-PRM), Mediterranean Forum of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (MFPRM), Hellenic Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (EEFIAP)
In association with International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ISPRM)
Indexed/Abstracted in: CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
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European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2009 September;45(3):391-401

 ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Patients’ pretreatment beliefs about recovery influence outcome of a pain rehabilitation program

Merrick D. 1,2, Sjölund B. H. 1,3

1 Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture Victims, Copenhagen, Denmark
2 Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine, Umeå, Sweden
3 University of Southern Denmark, Department of Public Health, Odense, Denmark

Aim. The aim of this study was to monitor the outcome of a five-week cognitive-behavioral interdisciplinary rehabilitation program for patients disabled by chronic pain, utilizing data collected for a national quality registry.
Methods. The study included 255 consecutive patients from a university hospital setting. Demographic data and patient beliefs about recovery recorded on a five-category scale were collected before the program. Pain intensity (VAS), Disability Rating Index (DRI) and life satisfaction (LiSat-11) were collected before, immediately after and one year after the program. Partial respondents and non-respondents were excluded;168 patients remained.
Results. Pain intensity decreased (“pain now”; Friedman’s test, P<0.0001) by 13 mm (median) after the program, (Dunn’s test; P<0.001) and by 5 mm after one year (P<0.05). Only one of twelve DRI items (activity), “participating in exercise/sports” improved significantly after rehabilitation (Wilcoxon’s test; P=0.0009), and remained improved one year later (P=0.0144). Life satisfaction in the physical and psychological domains increased after the program. A clinically meaningful reduction in pain intensity (≥10 mm) was reported by 43% of patients at the one-year follow-up. This group had significant increases in life satisfaction. Only patients with positive beliefs about recovery before rehabilitation showed a decrease in pain intensity at the one-year follow-up (P<0.028).
Conclusion. The program influenced the pain, life satisfaction and, to a small extent, activity. A clinically relevant pain reduction and an increase in life satisfaction were related. Patients’ pretreatment beliefs about recovery influenced the long-term decrease of pain intensity, indicating that more attention should be focused on patients’ pretreatment beliefs.

language: English


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