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EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL AND REHABILITATION MEDICINE

A Journal on Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation after Pathological Events


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (SIMFER), European Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ESPRM), European Union of Medical Specialists - Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Section (UEMS-PRM), Mediterranean Forum of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (MFPRM), Hellenic Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (EEFIAP)
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European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2009 September;45(3):385-9

language: English

Psychological distress in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

Vinci P. 1, Gargiulo P. 1,2, Panunzi M. 1,3, Baldini L. 2

1 Italian Charcot-Marie-Tooth, Association Rehabilitation Service, Rome, Italy
2 School of Psychology 2, “La Sapienza”University, Rome, Italy
3 Department of Psychology, ASL RM H (National Health Service), Albano Laziale, Rome, Italy


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Aim. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a genetic neuropathy that causes variable degrees of gait and handgrip impairment, and reduces quality of life. The large majority of CMT patients are moderately affected and lead almost a normal life despite facing numerous difficulties and physical and psychological suffering. This study is aimed at investigating the possible presence of psychological distress in this population.
Methods. Fifty-three patients (F=30, M=23; age: 16-64 years; disease duration: 1-53 years), with variable gait and handgrip impairments but still able to ambulate independently, referred to a specialized rehabilitation service, and 53 sex and age matched controls were administered with the Kellner’s Symptom Questionnaire Italian validated version.
Results. The mean scores of patients, both as a whole and as divided in groups according to sex, age and lower limb impairment severity, did not differ significantly from those of controls (P>0.05).
Conclusion. Patients with CMT are able to cope with the problems caused by their disease without developing more psychological distress than unaffected subjects, probably as the result of a comprehensive adaptation, favoured by the long disease duration, relative mildness of symptoms, good cognitive functioning and availability of rehabilitative resources.

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