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EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL AND REHABILITATION MEDICINE

A Journal on Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation after Pathological Events


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (SIMFER), European Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ESPRM), European Union of Medical Specialists - Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Section (UEMS-PRM), Mediterranean Forum of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (MFPRM), Hellenic Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (EEFIAP)
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European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2009 June;45(2):247-54

language: English

Trends in stroke rehabilitation

Roth E. J.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Stroke Rehabilitation Research and Training Center Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA


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Certain shifts and trends in stroke rehabilitation practices are occurring in the US, deriving from scientific developments, regulatory requirements, and other sources. The prevalence of stroke is increasing in the US, duration of rehabilitation hospitalizations is decreasing, and the availability of alternative methods and locations of rehabilitation services is expanding. More awareness of measures to treat medical comorbidities and the associated disabilities of stroke can be expected to enhance outcomes. New and innovative techniques, including constraint induced movement therapy, pharmacological agents, complementary or alternative medicine techniques such as acupuncture, and community activities such as exercise classes, are more widespread practices now. Novel technological interventions such as robotics and cortical stimulation are being developed to facilitate improved outcomes. The essential focus of these practices on enhancing quality of life of stroke survivors remains unaltered.

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