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EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL AND REHABILITATION MEDICINE

A Journal on Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation after Pathological Events


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (SIMFER), European Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ESPRM), European Union of Medical Specialists - Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Section (UEMS-PRM), Mediterranean Forum of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (MFPRM), Hellenic Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (EEFIAP)
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European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2008 March;44(1):19-25

language: English

The effect of balance training on motor recovery and ambulation after stroke: a randomized controlled trial

Eser F., Yavuzer G., Karakus D., Karaoglan B.

1 Clinic of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Ankara Numune Education and Research Hospital Ankara,Turkey
2 Ankara University Faculty of Medicine Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ankara, Turkey
3 Ankara Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Education and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
4 Gazi University Faculty of Medicine Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ankara, Turkey


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Aim. To investigate the effects of balance training, using force platform biofeedback, on motor recovery, mobility and activity level of hemiparetic patients with stroke.
Methods. In this randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded trial 41 inpatients [mean (±SD) age of 60.9 (±11.7) years] with hemiparesis after stroke (median time since stroke 6 months) were randomly assigned to an experimental or a control group. The control group (n=19) participated in a conventional stroke inpatient rehabilitation program, whereas the experimental group (n=22) received 15 sessions of balance training (using force platform biofeedback) in addition to the conventional program. Main outcome measures were motor recovery of the lower extremity (Brunnstrom staging), mobility (Rivermead Mobility Index, RMI) and activity level (Functional Independence Measure, FIM) that performed one week before and after the experimental treatment program.
Results. Both groups were similar in terms of baseline clinical characteristics. Motor recovery, mobility and activity level improved significantly in both groups (P<0.05). Between-group difference of mean change score was not significant for the Brunnstrom stages (0.23 vs 0.26), RMI (2.9 vs 2.2) and FIM score (10.7 vs 11.5).
Conclusion. In our group of stroke patients, balance training combined with a conventional rehabilitation program does not provide additional benefit in terms of lower extremity motor recovery, mobility and activity level.

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