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EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL AND REHABILITATION MEDICINE

A Journal on Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation after Pathological Events


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (SIMFER), European Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ESPRM), European Union of Medical Specialists - Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Section (UEMS-PRM), Mediterranean Forum of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (MFPRM), Hellenic Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (EEFIAP)
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Europa Medicophysica 1998 March;34(1):5-9

Copyright © 1998 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Balance recovery and relationship with ambulation distance in recent hemiparetic adults

Isakov E. 1, Mendelevich I. 1, Ring H. 2, Mizrahi J. 3

1 Kinesiology Laboratory, Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital, Tel Aviv University Medical School, Raanana, Israel; 2 Department of Neurologic Rehabilitation, Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital, Tel Aviv University Medical School, Raanana, Israel; 3 Department of Biomedical Engineering and the Julius Silver Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel


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BACKGROUND: The ­aims of ­this ­study ­were to doc­u­ment the recov­ery pro­cess of stand­ing bal­ance in ­stroke ­patients and to estab­lish wheth­er ambu­la­tion dis­tance (dichot­om­ised as 200 m or ­less) cor­re­lat­ed ­with the lev­el of stand­ing bal­ance.
METHODS: Ground reac­tion forc­es dur­ing stand­ing ­with ­eyes ­open and ­closed ­were meas­ured ny ­means of two ­force-­plates, for ­each leg sep­ar­ate­ly, 39 and 98 ­days ­after the ­onset of ­stroke. Ambulation dis­tance was eval­u­at­ed ­during the sec­ond stand­ing ­test.
RESULTS: During stand­ing ­with ­eyes ­open and ­closed ­there was a non­sig­nif­i­cant ­decrease in the ­mean val­ues of ante­ro­pos­ter­i­or and medio­lat­er­al forc­es meas­ured in ­both ­limbs in the sec­ond ­test. Changes in ­between-leg dif­fer­enc­es in ­both ­tests ­were ­also non­sig­nif­i­cant. In the ­whole sam­ple, the ­total ­sway activ­ity ­decreased sig­nif­i­cant­ly (p=0.022) in the sec­ond ­test ­only ­when stand­ing ­with ­eyes ­open. At the end of reha­bil­i­ta­tion, non­sig­nif­i­cant chang­es ­were ­observed ­between the val­ues of ­total ­sway activ­ity, ­both in ­those sub­jects who ­were ­able to ­walk ­over 200 m, and in ­those who ­were not.
CONCLUSIONS: Although the hem­i­pa­ret­ics who ­were ­able to ­walk dis­tanc­es of ­over 200 m ­swayed ­less ­whilst stand­ing, in the sec­ond ­test the cor­re­la­tion ­between ambu­la­tion dis­tance and stand­ing bal­ance did not ­reach sta­tis­ti­cal sig­nif­i­cance. Thus, stand­ing bal­ance ­appears to be a ­poor pre­dic­tor of ambu­la­tion dis­tance in hem­i­pa­ret­ic ­patients.

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