Home > Journals > Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia > Past Issues > Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia 2008 April;143(2) > Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia 2008 April;143(2):105-17

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints

GIORNALE ITALIANO DI DERMATOLOGIA E VENEREOLOGIA

A Journal on Dermatology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Dermatology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Indexed/Abstracted in: EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,014


eTOC

 

REVIEWS  VACCINES IN DERMATOLOGICAL EXPERIMENTAL THERAPY


Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia 2008 April;143(2):105-17

language: English

A possible role for vaccination in the treatment of psoriasis?

Baker B. S. 1, P.Owles A. V. 2, Fry L. 2

1 Private Practice
2 Faculty of Medicine Imperial College, St Mary’s Campus, London, UK


PDF  


Psoriasis is a multifactorial immune skin disease whose etiology involves a strong genetic component, involving several genes encoding proteins involved in epidermal differentiation and immune, inflammatory and pathogen responses, in combination with microbial environmental factors. Although various microorganisms appear to provoke or aggravate the disease, including Staphylococcus aureus, Malassezia and Candida albicans, the association between S. pyogenes throat infections and guttate psoriasis is supported by the strongest clinical evidence. Furthermore, the identification of peptidoglycan-specific T cells in psoriatic skin lesions has led to the proposal that cell wall peptidoglycan may mediate the link between streptococcal infection in the tonsils and the subsequent induction of skin lesions. These findings suggest that psoriasis may be a possible candidate for therapeutic streptococcal vaccination. Current treatments for psoriasis have several limitations including toxicity and an increased risk of infection and malignancy. In contrast, vaccination could potentially induce long-term tolerance without the side effects caused by global immunosuppression. Future research will need to address the identity of the triggering microbial antigen(s); such knowledge could open the way for vaccination as a therapeutic tool for psoriasis.

top of page

Publication History

Cite this article as

Corresponding author e-mail