Home > Journals > Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia > Past Issues > Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia 2007 December;142(6) > Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia 2007 December;142(6):649-58

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints

GIORNALE ITALIANO DI DERMATOLOGIA E VENEREOLOGIA

A Journal on Dermatology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Dermatology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Indexed/Abstracted in: EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,014


eTOC

 

REVIEWS  UPDATE ON CONTACT DERMATITIS


Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia 2007 December;142(6):649-58

language: English

Chemokines regulating lymphocyte migration into atopic dermatitis lesions

Vestergaard C. 1, Hvid M. 1, Deleuran B. 2, Deleuran M. 1

1 Department of Dermatology Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark
2 Department of Rheumatology Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark


PDF  


Atopic dermatitis is a chronic relapsing pruritic eczematous disease affecting between 15% and 20% of children, with a social, psychological and economical impact on the children and their families. After increasing during the 1970s and 1980s, the incidence of the disease seems to have levelled out in the 1990s. The cause of atopic dermatitis is still unknown, but detailed description of its pathogenesis has improved our understanding of the disorder and opened new possibilities for the development of more effective methods for its treatment. Histologically, the skin of atopic dermatitis patients is characterized by inflammation, with prevalent infiltration by lymphocytes but also mast cells, eosinophils, and macrophages, as well as dendritic cells. Attraction of these cells to the skin is in part mediated by chemokines. Small proteins belonging to four distinct families, chemokines mediate their effects by binding to chemokine receptors. Some chemokines can attract skin-specific lymphocytes and some can attract specific lymphocyte subpopulations such as Th2 lymphocytes. Experimental animal models for atopic dermatitis have shown that blocking of certain of these chemokines alleviates the eczematous condition in these animals, thus providing new and exciting targets for therapy, both at the protein and the mRNA level. The focus of this review is on the chemokines regulating lymphocyte trafficking into the skin lesions of atopic dermatitis.

top of page

Publication History

Cite this article as

Corresponding author e-mail