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GIORNALE ITALIANO DI DERMATOLOGIA E VENEREOLOGIA

A Journal on Dermatology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Dermatology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases
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Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia 2006 December;141(6):529-32

language: English

Confluent and reticulated papillomatosis (Gougerot - Carteaud): report of a case successfully treated with tazarotene

Gallo L. 1, Ayala F. 1, Lembo S. 1, Mansueto G. 2

1 Unit of Clinical, Allergological and Venereological Dermatology Department of Systematic Pathology Federico II University, Naples, Italy
2 Unit of Pathological Anatomy and Cythopatology Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences Federico II University, Naples, Italy


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Confluent and reticulated papillomatosis of Gougerot and Carteaud is an uncommon dermatosis, which is most frequent after the puberal age. It occurs sporadically, although familiar cases have been reported. It is characterized by flat, verrucous papules, that mainly appear on the neck and on the trunk. They have a tendency to coalesce, forming plaques, with a reticulated pattern, peripherally. The eruption is chronic with exacerbations and remissions. A keratinocyte differentiation and maturation alteration is the most probable aetiology. Endocrine disorders, genetic factors, photosensitivity and abnormal tissue reaction to fungi have also been suggested as causative agents. Ultraviolet light exposure and avitaminosis have been reported as triggering factors. Many therapies have been suggested: antibiotics, retinoids, calcipotriol, antifungals, but also vitamin A, urea, salicylic acid and sodium thiosulfate. We describe the case of an 11-year-old child with asymptomatic, well-demarcated, grey-brownish papules and plaques on the neck and on the trunk in a typical confluent and reticulated pattern. The child was otherwise in good health. She was treated with 0.05% tazarotene gel, twice daily and within 2 months the lesions had completely regressed. Therefore, we believe that, in the confined form, treatment with local retinoids may be an effective, safe alternative to systemic retinoid therapy.

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