Advanced Search

Home > Journals > Chirurgia > Past Issues > Chirurgia 2013 June;26(3) > Chirurgia 2013 June;26(3):237-9

ISSUES AND ARTICLES   MOST READ

CURRENT ISSUECHIRURGIA

A Journal on Surgery

Indexed/Abstracted in: EMBASE, Scopus, Emerging Sources Citation Index

Frequency: Bi-Monthly

ISSN 0394-9508

Online ISSN 1827-1782

 

Chirurgia 2013 June;26(3):237-9

    CASE REPORTS

Blunt traumatic external iliac vein disruption without pelvic fracture

Lin C.-C. 1, Liu K.-S. 1, Wu T.-J. 2, Huang Y.-K. 1, 3, Tsai F.-C. 1, Lin P. J. 1

1 Section of Cardiac Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou/ChiaYi Center and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan;
2 Section of General Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou/ChiaYi Center and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan;
3 Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan

Most blunt traumatic pelvic venous injuries are associated with pelvic fracture or iliac artery injury. Isolated blunt traumatic external iliac vein injury without pelvic fracture is extremely rare, but is potentially lethal. The operative exposure and repair of the iliac vessel is a test of a surgeon’s technical expertise and judgment, especially when the scenario is an intraoperative finding of an exsanguinous retroperitoneal hematoma. This study focused on surgical access to the external iliac venous injury, while exploring an expanding retroperitoneal hematoma.

language: English


FULL TEXT  REPRINTS

top of page