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Chirurgia 2007 June;20(3):155-9

Copyright © 2007 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Rare tumours of the breast: primary squamous cell carcinoma and primary leiomyosarcoma

Wai D. 1, Singhal R. 2, Hughes P. 3, Taylor J. L. 4, Parker S. J. 4

1 Foundation year 2 University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire, UK 2 Specialist Registrar, Division of General Surgery University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire, UK 3 Foundation year 2, Division of Histopathology University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire, UK 4 Consultant, Breast Unit University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire, UK


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Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the breast is a rare entity. Diagnosis requires exclusion of origin from local cutaneous structures and metastasis from other organs. Although squamous metaplasia can be seen in 4% of the invasive breast cancers, true primary SCC has an incidence of less than 1%. Presentation is varied and includes breast abscesses and skin changes. We present the case of an 89 year old lady who presented with a history of lump with overlying skin changes. Diagnosis of primary SCC was followed by a curative wide local excision. She made an uneventful post operative recovery. Primary leiomyosarcoma of the breast is another rare entity. The presentation is usually in the form of a slow growing mass often with benign appearances on radiology. They are frequently indistinguishable from a fibroadenoma or phylloides tumour. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion along with low threshold for carrying out histological and immunohistochemical studies. We present the case of a 36 year old woman who presented with a 14 year history of a lump which had recently become painful. Diagnosis of primary leiomyosarcoma was made on immunohistochemistry. This was followed by a curative wide local excision and she made an uneventful post operative recovery.

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