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Chirurgia 2006 December;19(6):463-4

Copyright © 2006 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis-myositis, toxic shock syndrome and death from minor skin erosione. A case report

Hountis P. 1, Hatziveis K. 2, Roumpeas C. 3, Bellenis I. 4

1 Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery Athens Naval and Veterans Hospital, Athens Greece 2 Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Chemistry Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras Greece 3 Biologist, Diagnostic and Microbiology Laboratory Kalamata Greece 4 Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery Evangelismos General Hospital, Athens Greece


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During the last twenty years in all over the world the cases of Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) have increased. The main element which characterize the disease is the different clinical manifestation and the variety of symptoms as well as the aggressive evolution that leads in multiorgan failure. In addition, a remarkable point is the possible port of entry of this infection and the different ages of the patients (from childhood till elderly). In some cases because of the fast and fulminant evolution of the disease the therapy is ineffective. The aim of our case report is to present the dismal outcome of a young female who was admitted in the Intensive Care Unit due to a cardiac arrest as the first symptom of rapid and fulminant necrotizing fasciitis and myositis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. The patient died in less than 24 hours before any other intervention being performed. We present this case due to its rapidity and that we still don’t know the causative factor, except a strong suspicion for an animal bite. Although this type of clinical course is extremely unusual for Mediterranean countries, to our knowledge, it is the first reported case in Greece.

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