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ITALIAN JOURNAL OF MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY

A Journal on Maxillofacial Surgery


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Maxillofacial Surgery


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Italian Journal of Maxillofacial Surgery 2006 April-December;17(1-3):63-9

language: English

Reconstruction of the anterior maxilla with bilateral mandibular ramus venneer grafting for implant placement

Acocella A. 1, Sacco R. 1, Catelani C. 1, Agostini T. 2, Nardi P. 1

1 Department of Odontostomathology Division of Maxillo-Facial Surgery Faculty of Medicine University of Florence, Florence, Italy
2 Department of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery Faculty of Medicine University of Florence, Florence, Italy


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The use of osseointegrated implants has become a standard treatment option in modern dental rehabilitation. Adequate bone quantity and quality is a prerequisite for a good aesthetic and biomechanical result. Alveolar ridge defects can be the result of trauma, periodontal diseases or other pathologic conditions, being them considered a problem for implant rehabilitation. In these cases, alveolar ridge augmentation is needed if endosseous implants are to be used. Xenografts, alloplastic bone grafts and allografts have been proposed for alveolar ridge augmentation; the use of autogenous bone grafts represents the “gold standard” for bone augmentation procedures. For the reconstruction of alveolar ridge defects, the common donor sites are the autogenous bone grafts of the mandibular symphysis or ramus. In fact, these donor sites offer important advantages like the avoidance of general anesthesia, a convenience due to the proximity between the donor site and the augmentation site, and the absence of cutaneous scar. The mandibular ramus is an intra-oral site that can supply excellent quality and, often, quantity of autogenous bone to be used in the augmentation of alveolar ridge deficiencies. The aim of this article is the description of the general surgical principles in harvesting the mandibular ramus as the main site donor. From a clinical point of view, this procedure appears to be simple, safe and effective for treating localised alveolar ridge defects in partially edentulous patients.

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