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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY

A Journal on Cardiac, Vascular and Thoracic Surgery

Indexed/Abstracted in: BIOSIS Previews, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,632

Frequency: Bi-Monthly

ISSN 0021-9509

Online ISSN 1827-191X

 

The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2016 June;57(3):448-56

NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN THE TREATMENT OF AORTIC ARCH LESIONS AND DISSECTIONS 

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Developments in parallel grafts for aortic arch lesions

Ralf R. KOLVENBACH 1, Asaf RABIN 2, Ron KARMELI 2, Alper ALPASLAN 1, Elizabeth SCHWIERZ 1

1 Department of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, Augusta Hospital and Catholic Hospital Group, Duesseldorf, Germany; 2 Department of Vascular Surgery, Carmel Medical Centre, Haifa, Israel

Due to the shortage of commercially available off the shelf aortic arch grafts since the last years parallel grafts or chimney grafts have played an increasing role in the treatment of patients with aortic arch lesions. Although there are still issues with type endoleaks and gutters between the chimney graft and the aortic stent-graft remaining. We report our results with the Medtronic thoracic graft in combination with long self-expanding parallel grafts, to ensure an overlapping zone of more than 7 cm between the different grafts. Alternatively, sandwich configurations are used where a direct contact between the parallel graft and the aortic wall is avoided. We have placed a total of 65 parallel grafts into supra-aortic branches. In 21 cases chimney grafts were placed into the carotid artery, in most cases into the left common carotid artery. In 36 cases chimney grafts were placed into left subclavian artery. A maximum number of 4 parallel grafts were placed for total endovascular debranching. In addition, in 8 patients a parallel graft had to be placed into the innominate artery. There was a patency of 69% for all subclavian artery chimney grafts versus 73% for carotid artery parallel grafts. Of note is a stroke rate of 5.2% in all these cases. Only 2 of the patients with an occluded left subclavian artery chimney graft required a bypass procedure for arm claudication or ischemia. We had a primary type I endoleak rate of 28%. In almost 25% secondary interventions were required mainly to treat type I leaks, in those cases where the leak did not resolve spontaneously. The overall mortality rate was 3.5%. The results of parallel graft in the aortic arch are promising, but of major concern is still the high rate of type I endoleaks as well as the neurological complication rate, most probably due to catheter manipulation in patients with severe atherosclerotic arch lesions.

language: English


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