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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY

A Journal on Cardiac, Vascular and Thoracic Surgery


Indexed/Abstracted in: BIOSIS Previews, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
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The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2015 June;56(3):473-82

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 ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Is removal of calcium bar during mitral valve surgery safe? Long-term clinical outcome of 109 consecutive patients

Papadopoulos N., Steuer K., Doss M., Moritz A., Zierer A.

Division of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Johann‑Wolfgang‑Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany

AIM: Risk factors for adverse outcome after decalcification and patch-reconstruction of the mitral annulus during mitral valve surgery are yet to be defined. For this purpose and for the report of long term results we reviewed our institutional data from over 10 years of mitral valve surgery in the presence of mitral annulus calcification.
METHODS: A total of 109 consecutive patients with a mean age of 66.4±14 years (Mean logistic EURO-Score: 18.6%) underwent mitral valve surgery in the presence of extensive calcification of mitral annulus between 1996 and 2008. After decalcification and patch-reconstruction of the mitral annulus, mitral valve repair was performed in 53 cases (49%) and the remaining 56 patients (51%) received a mitral valve replacement. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of adverse outcome.
RESULTS: Inhospital-mortality was 8.3% and the actuarial survival rate at 8 years 76.2%. Echocardiographic follow up was complete. 65 survivors (94.5%) showed none or only trivial mitral valve insufficiency. The freedom of reoperation at 8 years was 91.8%. We found hypertension, diabetes mellitus, age older than 65 years, NYHA class IV, end stage renal failure, failure to preserve the subvalvular apparatus as well as concomitant aortic valve replacement to be associated with a significant increase of early or/and late mortality.
CONCLUSION: Despite the complexity of this pathology, decalcification and patch-reconstruction of the mitral annulus during mitral valve surgery can be performed with low technical risk and acceptable long-term results.

language: English


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