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THE JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY

A Journal on Cardiac, Vascular and Thoracic Surgery


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THORACIC AND ABDOMINAL AORTA  UPDATE ON MANAGEMENT OF CAROTID, AORTIC AND PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL PATHOLOGIES


The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2015 April;56(2):197-215

language: English

Current and future perspectives in the repair of aneurysms involving the aortic arch

Maurel B. 1, Sobocinski J. 1, Spear R. 1, Azzaoui R. 1, Koussa M. 1, Prat A. 1, Tyrrell M. R. 2, Hertault A. 1, Haulon S. 1

1 Vascular and Cardiac Surgery, Aortic Centre, Hôpital Cardiologique, CHRU de Lille, France;
2 King’s Health Partners, London, UK


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The repair of aneurysms involving the aortic arch is technically and physiologically demanding. Historically, these aneurysms have been treated using open surgical techniques that require cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Many patients have been deemed “untreatable” and among those selected for surgery there are reported risks of death in 2% to 16.5% and stroke rates ranging from 2% to 18%. “Hybrid arch repair” combines one of a number of open surgical procedures (to secure a proximal landing zone for an endograft) with subsequent or immediate placement of an endograft in the arch and descending aorta. Although this concept is described as “minimally invasive” because it avoids aortic cross-clamping and hypothermic circulatory arrest, the morbidity and mortality rates remain considerable (mortality 0% to 15%, stroke 0% to 11%). Ongoing development of endograft technology has enabled total endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms involving the visceral segment, using fenestrated and branched endografts. Encouraging early results in this anatomy have inspired extension of the concept to include the aortic arch and great vessels. These strategies can be considered in patients generally at high-risk for the conventional procedures. However, the endeavour is at an early stage of its development and the arch poses unique challenges including the potential for stroke, angulation of the arch and the great vessel ostia to the arch, extremely high volume flow, three-dimensional pulsation and rotation with the cardiac cycle and the proximity of the aortic valve and coronary arteries.

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stephan.haulon@chru-lille.fr