Home > Journals > The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery > Past Issues > The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2009 April;50(2) > The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2009 April;50(2):205-212

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints

THE JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY

A Journal on Cardiac, Vascular and Thoracic Surgery


Indexed/Abstracted in: BIOSIS Previews, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,632


eTOC

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES  VASCULAR SECTION


The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2009 April;50(2):205-212

language: English

Should octogenarians be denied access to surgery for acute type A aortic dissection?

Piccardo A., Regesta T., Pansini S., Concistrè G., Dell’Aquila A., Scarano F., Martinelli L., Passerone G.

Should octogenarians be denied access to surgery for acute type A aortic dissection?


PDF  


Aim. Outcomes after surgery for acute type A aortic dissection in the octogenarian are controversial. To analyze this issue further, the authors reviewed their experience in the hope of finding ways to improve results in these high-risk patients.
Methods. Between April 1990 and November 2006, 319 consecutive patients underwent emergency surgery for acute type A aortic dissection at the San Martino University Hospital of Genoa (Italy). Among them, 23 (7%) patients were aged 80 years or older (mean age 82 years, range 80 to 86 years) and represent the study population. On admission 7 patients (30%) had preoperative shock, 1 needed cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 7 (30%) had a neurological deficit, 2 (9%) had acute renal failure. Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest was performed in 19 patients (83%). Surgical procedures included isolated replacement of the ascending aorta in all patients associated with root replacement in 2 (9%) and total aortic arch replacement in 5 (22%). Median follow up was 4.1 years (range 3 to 83 months).
Results. Hospital mortality was 61% (14 of 23 patients). Late mortality was 11% (1 of 9 survivors). Stepwise logistic regression identified the extension of surgery to the arch as independent risk factors for hospital death. Fourteen patients (61%) had 1 or more postoperative complications. Overall survival was 39±10% and 33±10% after 1 and 5 years respectively.
Conclusion. Surgery for acute type A aortic dissection in the octogenarian shows high hospital mortality but satisfactory long-term survival among discharged patients. A less aggressive approach should increase the outcomes of surgically managed patients.

top of page

Publication History

Cite this article as

Corresponding author e-mail