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THE JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY

A Journal on Cardiac, Vascular and Thoracic Surgery


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The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2008 April;49(2):167-77

language: English

Recent advances in atherectomy and devices for treatment of infra-inguinal arterial occlusive disease

Nguyen M C., Garcia L. A.

Division of Cardiology and Vascular Medicine Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA


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The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) continues to rise in an ever ageing society and consumes a significant part of health resources. Percutaneous revascularization has revolutionized the treatment of lower extremity peripheral vascular disease over the past 10 years. Additionally, novel devices have allowed improved endovascular treatment of femoropopliteal as well as infrapopliteal disease. Although percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) can be an effective modality for focal lesions in the iliac arteries, the results for complex infra-inguinal arterial disease have been disappointing. One class of new technology has concentrated on debulking the plaque, while others focus to improve safety (distal embolic protection devices) or are directed to specific clinical challenges such as chronic total occlusions. However, the lack of uniform performance criteria and reporting standards for these and other devices has resulted in heterogeneous study end points, making comparative efficacy difficult. Here we review the current data for atherectomy and atheroablative technologies as well as other adjunctive devices in the treatment of lower extremity peripheral arterial disease.

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