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THE JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY

A Journal on Cardiac, Vascular and Thoracic Surgery


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The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2007 February;48(1):73-7

language: English

Aortic valve replacement after previous coronary artery bypass grafting: experience with a simplified approach

Reber D. 1, Fritz M. 1, Bojara W., Marks P., Laczkovics A., Tossios P.

1 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery Bergmannsheil Bochum Ruhr-University Hospital Bochum, Germany
2 Department of Cardiology Bergmannsheil Bochum Ruhr-University Hospital Bochum, Germany


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Aim. Aortic valve replacement (AVR) after previous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), particularly in a patent left internal thoracic artery (ITA), is a challenge. Avoidance of injuring the patent graft and ensuring myocardial protection are important issues in the management of these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate a simplified surgical approach to these reoperations.
Methods. Between January 2003 and June 2005, 19 of 287 AVRs performed at our institution were in a patient subset (mean age 70 years, range: 62-82) who received AVR after previous CABG surgery. The aortic valve gradients were between 50 and 107 mm Hg. Our operation strategy followed the KIS-principle (keep it simple): both femoral vessels were cannulated using the Seldinger technique. Only the area around the ascending aorta and the right atrium was dissected to permit x-clamping, aortotomy, and catheterization for retrograde cardioplegia and a left ventricular vent. The anterior aspect of the heart and the left side, where the ITA was embedded and patent, were left untouched and not clamped.
Results. The mean interval between the first and second operation was 6.5 years. Fourteen patients received biological prostheses. Four patients received an additional surgery at the time of AVR. The mean operating time was 267 min; the mean AoX-clamp time was 63 min. One patient died because of severe heart failure. In all others the postoperative course was uneventful.
Conclusion. We believe that the indication for AVR in patients scheduled for CABG should be re-evaluated. In those in which Redo-surgery for new or increased valve stenosis is indicated, a simple and safe surgical option is presented.

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