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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY

A Journal on Cardiac, Vascular and Thoracic Surgery


Indexed/Abstracted in: BIOSIS Previews, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
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The journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2004 December;45(6):545-50

CARDIAC SECTION 

 ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Beneficial effect of aspirin on renal function in patients with renal insufficiency postcardiac surgery

Gerrah R. 1, Ehrlich S. 2, Tshori S. 3, Sahar G. 2

1 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery Hebrew University, Hadassah University Hospital Jerusalem, Israel
2 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery Rabin Medical Center Sackler Medical School, Petah Tikva, Israel
3 Department of Medical Biochemistry Hebrew University, Hadassah University Hospital
Jerusalem, Israel

Aim. Renal function is one of the most important prognostic factors following cardiac surgery. Whether aspirin affects cardiopulmonary bypass related renal injury is investigated in this study.
Methods. Ninety-four patients with impaired renal function (creatinine ≥1.5 mg/dl) undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) were categorized into 2 groups according to aspirin administration before surgery. Serum creatinine, urinary output and creatinine clearance along with other perioperative factors were compared between the 2 groups prior to surgery, 24 hours and 48 hours following cardiopulmonary bypass.
Results. Creatinine levels increased significantly in the second postoperative day only in the non-aspirin (control) group (3.7±1.6 vs 2.9±1.7 mg/dl, p=0.03). Aspirin (study) group had lower creatinine levels in day 1 (p=0.03) and day 2 (p=0.001). Furthermore, in the study group creatinine clearance was higher in day 1 (34.3±14.3 vs 30.9±13.1 ml/min, p=0.01) and in day 2 (32.6±13.8 vs 26.4±9.8 ml, p<0.0001). Creatinine levels at discharge were elevated compared to the preoperative levels in the control group (p=0.01). However, the study group had lower creatinine levels at discharge (2.6±1.4 vs 3.8±1.6 mg/dl, p<0.0001).
Urinary output was higher in the study group in the first postoperative day compared to the control group (p=0.01). Postoperative bleeding was slightly increased in the study group compared to the control group (760±230 ml vs 530±210 ml, p=0.01).
Conclusion. Continuation of aspirin administration until the day of surgery may have a protective effect against renal injury resulting from cardiopulmonary bypass, with only a negligible increase in bleeding. Possible explanations for this effect are antiplatelet activity of aspirin during cardiopulmonary bypass causing inhibition of vasoconstrictive agents like thromboxane, and improvement of renal perfusion by reducing blood viscosity.

language: English


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