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The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 1999 August;40(4):477-9

Copyright © 2000 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Significance of the human immunodeficiency virus infection in patients submitted to cardiac surgery

Everson Uip D., Zeigler R., Sabbaga Amato M., Varejao Strabelli T. M., Aranha Camargo L. F., Grinberg M.*, Domingos Jatene A.**

From the Department of Epidemiology and Quality Control * Hospital Infection Control Commission ** Surgery Department and from the Heart Institute Instituto do Coração do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil


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Back­ground. To ­realize if car­diac sur­gery ­could inter­fere ­with the evo­lu­tion of HIV ­infected ­patients to the ­acquired immu­no­def­i­ciency syn­drome (­AIDS).
­Methods. The ­study ­group con­sisted of 30 HIV pos­i­tive ­patients (0.21%) ­among 14,785 who under­went car­diac sur­gery at the ­Heart Insti­tute of Uni­ver­sity of São ­Paulo Med­ical ­School (­Incor-­FMUSP) ­from ­November 1988 to ­December 1994. ­Patients ­were fol­lowed up ­until ­they ­were dis­charged ­from hos­pital and a new con­tact was ­kept at the end of the ­first ­semester of 1995.
­Results. All ­patients ­were asymp­to­matic at the ­time ­they ­were oper­ated. Two ­patients pro­gressed to ­death ­during hos­pi­tal­iza­tion due to non-infec­tious com­pli­ca­tions and ­other ­three ­patients ­could not be ­traced. ­After all, 25 ­pa-tients had ­their pro­gres­sion eval­u­ated. Six ­patients (24%) ­died ­within a ­period ­ranging ­from 1 to 46 ­months (average=17 ­months): 2 due to bac­te­rial pneu­monia and 04 due to ­AIDS-­related com­pli­ca­tions. The ­average ­follow-up ­period for the 19 sur­viving ­patients was 33.6 ­months (­ranging ­from 13 to 74 ­months), and ­only one of ­them (5.3%) saw the infec­tion ­progress to ­AIDS. In sum­mary, 5/25 (20%) saw HIV infec­tion ­progress to ­AIDS ­within a max­imum ­period of 74 ­months.
Con­clu­sions. ­Data avail­able up to now ­show no con­clu­sive evi­dence of accel­er­a­tion of HIV ­into ­AIDS asso­ciated ­with car­diac sur­gery.

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