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CURRENT ISSUEACTA VULNOLOGICA

A Journal on Physiopathology and Therapy of Chronic Cutaneous Ulcers


Official Journal of the Italian Association for Cutaneous Ulcers
Indexed/Abstracted in: EMBASE, Scopus, Emerging Sources Citation Index


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ORIGINAL ARTICLES  


Acta Vulnologica 2004 June;2(1-2):9-11

language: Italian

Clinical evaluation of Sorbact® in the treatment of infected pressure sores

Mussi C., Salvioli G.

Centre of Gerontologic Evaluation and Research University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy


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Aim. Pressure sores present a high risk of becoming infected and chronic. The bacteria adsorbing dressing Sorbact® is able to lower the concentration of pathogenic microorganisms in the infected ulcers without pharmacological activity, but by hydrophobic interaction that takes place between 2 hydrophobic surfaces: the Sorbact® dressing and the microbial cell surface that bind to each other. As a result, when Sorbact® is changed the microorganisms that bind to the dressing are removed from the ulcer. The aim of the trial was to verify how Sorbact® can reduce the signs of infection in a group of patients suffering from infected pressure sores.
Methods. Thirty-three patients showing at least one infected pressure sore were enrolled and randomized in 2 groups: the control group (14 patients, treated according to specific guidelines) and the “Sorbact®” group (19 patients, who received the same treatment, except that the usual dressing was substituted with Sorbact®).
Results. Patients treated with Sorbact® showed a significant improvement in ulcer’s bed colour (94.7% vs 71.4%; p=0.034), an increase of cells debris dissolution (52.6% vs 42.8%; p=0.048), a reduction of both oedema and perilesional erythema (78.9% vs 57.1%; p=0.028) and a reduction in days of treatment (9±2 vs 11±2.1; p=0.041) compared to the patients in the control group.
Conclusion. Sorbact®’s ability to “bind” the hydrophobic pathogenic microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) and to lower their concentration in infected ulcers has been confirmed in our trial; in fact, by adding Sorbact® to the usual systemic antibiotics, we could increase the positive results rate, in a significantly shorter time. Sorbact® therefore has proved to be a useful dressing in the first line treatment of pressure sores, because it speeds up the control of infection and, consequently, the healing process.

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